Orbital (Eye) Disorders

Orbital (Eye) Disorders2018-08-10T19:07:07+00:00

EPIPHORA (EXCESSIVE TEARING)

Epiphora, or excessive tearing, is defined as the overflow of tears from one or both eyes. Epiphora can occur continuously, or it can occur intermittently. Epiphora is subdivided into two main categories: overproduction of tears or inadequate drainage of tears. Epiphora due to nasolacrimal duct obstruction can be a significant problem for patients. If you have excessive tearing, a simple procedure known as a DCR may permanently relieve your problem with tearing.

GRAVES’ EYE DISEASE

Graves’ eye disease, also known as thyroid eye disease, is an autoimmune condition in which immune cells attack the thyroid gland, which responds by secreting an excess amount of thyroid hormone. As a result, the thyroid gland enlarges and excess hormones increase metabolism: a state characterized by fast pulse/heartbeat, palpitations, profuse sweating, high blood pressure, irritability, fatigue, weight loss, heat intolerance, and loss of hair and alterations in hair quality.

Symptoms include:

  • Swelling of the eyelids and tissue around the eye
  • A constant stare
  • Eyelid retraction
  • Dry eyes or a sensation of grit or irritation to the eye
  • Watering and redness of the eyes
  • Sensitivity to light
  • A feeling of pressure in the eye sockets
  • Double vision
  • Loss of vision

Treatment for thyroid eye disease generally occurs in two phases. The first phase involves treating the active eye disease. This active period usually lasts 2 to 3 years and requires careful monitoring until stable. Treatment during the active phase of the disease focuses on preserving sight and the integrity of the cornea as well as providing treatment for double vision when it interferes with daily functioning and becomes bothersome.